All good things…

By Kristy Harding

It’s been almost three years since Paper Tape began publishing. With regret I announce that as of today, Paper Tape submissions will be closed indefinitely. In many ways, I believe that the past few months have been some of our best, but it’s time for us to move on to other things.

From the beginning, I’ve been amazed by the support for this publication. I’m proud of what we built here, and I plan to keep this site haunting the Internet as long as possible.

It’s been an incredible journey that wouldn’t have been possible without the artists and writers who trusted us with their work, especially Sid, Matt, Elizabeth, and Maya. Thanks to Leander, Brandon, Tom, Ian, Kristi, Crista, Nate, Hannah, and Keagan for believing in Paper Tape when it was no more than a crazy scheme and helping to launch this venture. Editors Jessica and Harmony, I owe you an incredible debt for all of your help and support and sticking with it to the end.

To all of you reading this, may your reel of the fantastic never run out.

END

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INTERVIEW: Simone Caroti (Part 2)

Simone Caroti is Course Director for Science Fiction and Fantasy at Full Sail University and a senior research scientist at the Astrosociology Research Institute (ARI), a non-profit organization devoted to bringing the humanities and the social sciences into the debate on human colonization of outer space. He is the author of The Generation Starship in Science Fiction: A Critical History, 1934-2001, and The Culture Series of Iain M. Banks: A Critical Introduction, which was published by McFarland in 2015.

This is the second part of a two part interview. Part 1 was published in November 2014. In the second part of his interview with Paper Tape editor Kristy Harding, Simone talks about his new book, some recent happenings in fantasy and science fiction, and what he plans to write about next.

PT: So, when we left off last time, you were still writing the book. How did the rest of the process go? Continue reading

If You Ask Me: The Ranting Sister

By Matt Galletta 

Question:

My sister likes to rant. A lot. What she rants about doesn’t really matter because we agree about most of the things she likes to rant about. (Though lately it’s been about how everyone is overreacting to threat of Ebola in the US and not concerned enough about what’s going on in Africa.) The problem is that I DO agree with her, and I feel like no matter what I say she goes off on me. It’s like she has this whole lecture planned out, and she needs someone to sit through it. There’s no room for me to talk at all. I’ve told her that if she just needs an audience she should get a blog, but she won’t. She won’t even say anything to our uncle who posts American Ebola stuff nonstop on Facebook. Lately, I’ve been finding myself avoiding her. I don’t like it, but I don’t know what else to do.

So you’ve been avoiding your sister…like the plague?

(Pause for hysterical laughter) Continue reading

INTERVIEW: Joston Theney

Joston Theney is the director and writer of the new horror film Axeman as well as the thriller, Adam K, which is currently in production.  A native of Atlanta, he became a fan of horror when he discovered a relative’s collection of 80s horror flicks.

In this interview, novelist Sidney Williams and Joston talk about the chance meeting that led to Axeman, the process of creating a homage to 80s slashers, and why axes are so terrifying.

An audio version of this interview can be found in Episode 14 of Sidney’s horror podcast Fear on Demand.

SW: Joston, from the trailer at least, it looks as if you’ve crafted a slasher film with just a little bit more to the story. Can you give us just a brief synopsis of what the tale is about?

JT: Sure, sure, sure. … Axeman—you’re right there’s just a little bit more to it than just being a straightforward slasher. It’s number one an homage to 80s slashers. In and of itself it has all of the prerequisite stereotypes that are typically found in 80s slasher films, but what we tried to do also is make all of those stereotypes very, very human and very familiar, not just in a sense of things you’ve seen on the surface but make it more familiar to you in terms of making the characters more real and more grounded and giving them more gravitas.

We also have the prerequisite group of friends who show up in a cabin in the middle of nowhere. They sit around and they discuss these urban legends, and one of them turns out to be very, very true, which is the tale of the Axeman of Cutter’s Creek, which is part of the folklore of the Big Bear community. We also have a group of bank robbers who’ve descended on the cabin as their getaway from the heat of the cops as well as people they double crossed to steal the money. We use that money as a backdrop to talk about humanity and how money changes people and it changes people’s motivations. And so you have all of that swirling together as people are being hacked to pieces. Continue reading

Photo Finish

By Dana Bowman

Contemplating the beginning of a run is like contemplating world peace,  cumbersome and impossible.  She proceeded anyway, and slowly her jangled nerves and tired muscled eased into a rhythm.  The soft pad, pad, pad of her feet against the sodden leaves on the road kept time with her heartbeat.  A squirrel skittered across her path, and one of the neighbor dogs barked longingly at her as she passed.  The town felt quilted from loud sounds by the cold.

It was Saturday evening, so she avoided Main street.  Usually this was a favorite part of her run, always someone to wave to; the glowing windows filled with antiques and snow shovels or cheerful floral displays.  But this night she headed out of town, to the dirt road that would lead her to fields brown with stubble. She craved a solitary place so badly it made her grimace.  The dirt road was lumpy and damp, slowing her considerably.  This, she realized, was good.  She could watch things.  She could just run and breathe and look.   In the distance, a creek bed was laced with more of the inky black trees, their branches like spidery cracks in a windshield.  The night glowed behind them creating cut images and silhouettes in the blue.  On a fencepost she actually spotted a hawk waiting for some poor field mouse.  It fluffed its feathers and posed for her, looked cross.  No meal yet.   Tonight was not for speed or pacing or tempo runs.  Tonight was a night to run as far away as possible.  And then, run farther still.

Continue reading

Paper Tape’s New Staff Contributor

Paper Tape is pleased to welcome our new staff contributor, Elizabeth C. Creely.

You may remember Elizabeth from the essay we published in October (“Behold the Egg: Tarin Towers and the Making of Ritual“). Now she’s agreed to come back and write a monthly column for Paper Tape about noise/sound.

Elizabeth C. Creely received an MFA from San Francisco State University in 2005 and has been published in The New Hibernia Review, the Dogwood Journal, and The Mississippi Review. Her essays have also appeared in three anthologies: Manifest West: Eccentricities of Geography, New California Writing 2013, and Extended Family: Essays on Being Irish American from the New Hibernia Review. She blogs at Dinnshenchas and lives in San Francisco with her husband.

Check back in tomorrow for the first entry in her column.

Welcome aboard, Elizabeth!